Exhibits › Mundo Caliente

About Mundo Caliente

It’s a hot world — and it may be getting hotter!

Some scientists believe that our planet is entering another cycle of dramatic climate change. We could be facing a protracted period of sweltering summers, raging hurricanes, and erratic weather patterns. Many people also believe that this dire situation will be intensified by the industrial world’s addiction to fossil fuels.

Whether or not the bad news about the weather is true remains to be seen. But our precious world remains a place of changing beauty. Mountains rise up and erode; islands emerge and submerge; rivers flood and go dry…

The Mundo Caliente print series explores the aesthetics of global warming through paint and pixel. I hope that my images surprise your eye and stimulate your thinking about this global conundrum.

Bob Barancik
April 2008

Prints

Exhibition Information

Contents:

12 digital prints, signed and numbered by the artist. Each image is 28x28 inch square and is shipped ready to hang; details available upon request. All prints are on archival rag paper and created with archival pigments. The print series is limited to 250.

Exhibition Video:

The award-winning Mundo Caliente is available both on the web and as a DVD.

Catalog:

Available through Blurb. This catalog is available in both soft and hard cover. The design can be easily customized to publicize donors, trustees, and other items unique to a particular installation.

Workshops and Lectures:

Information is available upon request. Each program is custom tailored to a particular audience.

Space Required:

Approximately 60 running feet.

Participation Fee:

$2,500.00 rental fee for two months. The entire show (12 ready-to-hang prints) can be purchased for $3,000.00. If each of the prints were purchased separately with the archival hanging protocol, the cost would be $5,400.00. This is a one-time introductory offer.

Shipping:

Host institution will make arrangements and pay for shipping costs but will be assisted in the logistics by a member of the CreativeShare staff. UPS has estimated that it can pack, transport, and insure the exhibition for under $200.00 to virtually any location in the continental United States.

Insurance:

Host institution will provide a certificate of insurance for the entire replacement value of the rental exhibition while it is in their care. This is $5,400.00. Obviously, if the institution chooses to buy the entire show, it will make its own insurance arrangements.

Available Dates:

Negotiable

Contact:

Bob Barancik
bobcreates@earthlink.net
215-964-3937 (cell)

Video

Buy the Book

Mundo Caliente: It's a Hot World!
A Print Series by Bob Barancik

Hardcover: $30.95
Softcover: $16.95

Available on Blurb.com

When Art Foretells the Future…of oil spills


















Iconoclastic artists and intellectuals often have their ears to the ground, nostrils sniffing the wind, and eyes scanning the horizon…or sidewalk for pennies.

It is often an uncomfortable lifestyle. But it does serve a useful societal function.

Image-makers in a digital age can readily communicate their unease, anxieties, speculations to a global audience through the internet. It is a truism that highly creative people often view the world through childlike eyes and are prone to state the obvious.

In the classic childhood fable “The Emperor’s New Clothes,” it was a little boy (not the prosperous and serious courtiers) who yelled “the emperor is naked!” Perhaps truth telling is connected to arrested social development and not knowing when to shut up.

Nearly four years ago, I was at a wonderful concert at the Palladium Theater in St. Pete featuring pianist Paul Wilborn and his sizzling songstress. Their rendition of “You Give Me Fever” just about burnt the house down.

It certainly got me to thinking about sex…and the burning of fossil fuels…and perhaps doing a slightly titillating video on the subject of global warming.

The legal complications and expenses of trying to use Peggy Lee’s hit standard of “Fever” put it out of bounds for an indie artist/producer like myself. It was easier and a lot more fun to hire my longtime music mavens Phyllis Chapell and Dan Kleiman in Philly to make some new music. I chose a hot Latin sound and name (Mundo Caliente: It’s a Hot World!) for the project.

My video-magician in Rochester Dave Puls and digital print guru Brad Erickson in St. Pete also jumped into this hot creative world.

We created an award-winning video that was screened at numerous international film festivals over the last several years, as well as a series of 30 striking digital prints.

In the print series, I never liked nine of the images and refrained from exhibiting them. They made me genuinely uncomfortable. There was a hellish quality to them.

Likewise, there is a hellish quality to our national addiction to Gulf of Mexico deepwater rigs and despotic Middle East oil. The out-of-control spills and fires, resource wars, episodes of epic corporate and governmental incompetence, and the global reality of smog-choked cities together create a devilishly depressing vision.

I look at the images at the side of this blog and am genuinely surprised what my unconscious mind painted years ago. These images are evocative warnings of today’s predicament.

As the great cartoonist, Walt Kelly, said through his alter-ego Pogo character over 40 years ago:

“We have met the enemy and he is us.”

Below are links to key articles and imagery about the BP gusher-oil slick:

Top Florida Marine Biologist does Q&A
(Florida Thinks website)

Controlled burn of BP Oil Spill in the Gulf of Mexico
(YouTube)

View of oil slick from low flying airplane
(YouTube)

Is Climate Change Worth Tackling? A Reply To Jim Manzi
(The Atlantic magazine)

Deepwater Explosion and key photo
(Wikipedia)

Action is the Antidote to Despair: A photographer confronts the BP oil disaster
(YES! Magazine)


Additional Information

This print series was developed from the paintings created by Bob Barancik. The artwork was electronically translated into graphic images by Bradley Erickson. The art direction was provided by Amy Blake.

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